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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX News
Dec 5, 2012 10:00am PST
revolt. but megyn: violent protests outside of egypt right now. members of president mohammed morsi's islam brotherhood. just think about what has happened here. the folks gathered en masse to protest the old leader, hosni mubarak. the muslim brotherhood said let's go for it. they reversed themselves and they rimini one. now, the people are back on the streets, protesting the new democratic policies by the new guy, where he did this huge paragraph, said that he could ignore the supreme court, pushed to the constitution, highly questionable, and the people in egypt are wondering what happened. human rights activists inside the country are claiming that the muslim brotherhood is now paying thugs to sexually assault women and physically assault men who gather in the square. fox news is not able to confirm these reports. several activists on the ground say that situation is getting very ugly again. steve harrigan is live from cairo. reporter: megyn, these are some of the worst clashes that we have seen so far in the protest. in the past, it has been pleased battling the protesters. righ
FOX Business
Dec 5, 2012 1:00pm EST
mohamed morsi returned to cairo palace after fleeing last night. tens of thousands of protesting the constitution, the trap is set for a vote on december 15. riot police have been deployed to separate supporters and opponents of president morsi. anti-morsi protesters that he is stripped judiciary of power and rushing through his constitution backed by largely islamist handle. egyptian president has said the referendum vote on the constitution draft will go on as planned despite protests. lori: it is a shocking. unreal. melissa: paying the price for hurricane sandy, fema asking for more money to foot the bill. how does the federal government plan to pay for this? lori: the social networking site moving up in the world. how investors could benefit the head. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attentio which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that
CNBC
Dec 7, 2012 7:00pm EST
it. >>> again today the crowds are still demanding that president mohammed moed morsi step down. latest from cairo. >>> free market capitalism is the best bet for -- i don't think we should be raising taxes at all. but that's my point of view. i'm kudlow. we'll be right back two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. . >>> tens of thousands of protesters are still surging around egypt's presidential palace. nbc reporter joins us now with the details. good evening, eamon. >> reporter: the media is reporting that the country's commission has ordered a vote scheduled to begin tomorrow in embassies around the world on the country's draft constitution to be postponed
CNN
Dec 6, 2012 4:00am PST
, after angry protests against political moves by the president, mohamed morsi, have turned deadly. tanks, armored personnel vehicles, all stationed outside the presidential analysis cairo. not only are they guarding the palace, they're also keeping apart supporters and opponents of morsi. hundreds of his islamist supporters already taking to the streets in cairo this morning. opponents are gathering not very far away. last night the two sides clashed right outside the palace. the violence killed at least five people. hundreds of other people were injured. opponents are demanding that morsi dial back on those sweeping powers that he has granted himself. cnn's reza sayah is live for us in cairo this morning. what's the latest? >> reporter: soledad, we're getting the first signs that maybe, just maybe, cooler heads are prevailing and peace could be extraordinary in front of the presidential palace. within the past 20 minutes, we've seen about a few thousand of president morsi's supporters move away from the palace area and the crowd seems to be thinning out. we're getting reports that this
MSNBC
Dec 10, 2012 3:00am PST
become the best friend of the muslim brotherhood in egypt, even as president mohamed morsi was asserting dictatorial powers and his followers were beating up secular liberals in the streets of cairo? when assessing the turbulent events in the arab world, we should remind ourselves that we're witnessing a revolution that may take decades to produce a stable outcome, with the outcome so hard to predict, it's a mistake to make big bets on any particular player. america will help the arab world through this turmoil if it states clearly that u.s. policy is guided by its interests and values, not by transient alliances and friendships. if morsi wants to be treated as a democratic leader, he will have to act like one." and david, i guess we can begin with that question. will he ultimately? can he? and are these fluctuations expected? >> morsi did something that's, in hindsight, a very stupid move. on november 22nd, he announced that he was no longer subject to review by the egyptian courts. and this was read, i think, properly as an attempt to get near dictatorial powers as egypt headed toward
MSNBC
Dec 12, 2012 3:00am PST
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)